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Painting a Swimming Pool


Pool Painting a Swimming Pool-a pool is dependent almost entirely on the instructions being adhered to religiously.
Painting a pool is a task not to be taken lightly. It is an area many paint manufacturers and retailers shy away from because of problems that can occur.

The successful painting of a pool is dependent almost entirely on the instructions being adhered to religiously. Shipway Spescoat and Topline Paint have many decades experience in these types of coatings and in the painting of pools and similar structures. We have developed this range of literature to assist you with your pool painting projects.

These suggestions are made for good reason and not just to improve our sales figures! If you take shortcuts or ignore any of the instructions regarding the surface preparation or the actual painting requirements e.g. climatic conditions etc. You are very likely to encounter problems.

Please read all the documentation and listen to our staff. Take time to ask questions and most importantly bring us accurate measurements of your pool and any details of any unusual issue with your pool. The more we know the better we can assist you.

There are 3 main types of Pool Paint; 2 Pack Epoxy, Chlorinated Rubber and 2 Pack Polyurethane.

For permanent immersion in water, Forminex 656 Epoxy Pool paint is undoubtedly the best choice. We recommend Epoxy in all cases except:-
When being applied over existing chlorinated rubber coatings. In this situation use Forminex 340 Chlorinated Rubber.
When being used in water at temperatures over 32°C. In this situation use 677 Supergloss 2 Pack Polyurethane.
When there is frequent exposure to direct sunlight ie not covered by water. In this situation use 677 Supergloss 2 Pack Polyurethane.

Fibreglass pools, depending on how they are constructed, can cause major problems as they age. Fibreglass pools start to breakdown as soon as they are installed and have a limited life span. Poorly constructed Fibreglass pools often contain moisture within the glass or have been made from inferior resin, which may result in osmosis blisters or black spot. Fibreglass pools still however need to be painted and epoxy provides the best barrier from excessive moisture intake. Specialist advice is sometimes needed.

Concrete and Marble Sheen pools generally fair better with age, however both can deteriorate. Small areas of damage can be repaired by the DIY handyman although more extensive failure of concrete or marblesheen will require professional attention. One particular problem to note for owners of older marble sheen pools. When the pool has been emptied and dried out sometimes the marblesheen can blister. These blisters are large, thick blisters and produce a drummy sound when tapped. These can occur at any time before or during the painting process but more frequently after some time dried and exposed to the sun – in other words after the paint has been applied. Of course this can be blamed on the paint but it’s an unfortunate consequence of the age of the marblesheen and the facts just been dried out after years of being saturated. It can be repaired and fixed but there is no real way to know if this will happen or not when the pool is drained. It’s not common however – we usually only see one or two examples of this in a year.

When your pool is emptied you can tap the bottom and walls and listen for a drummy sound. If you hear this sound or start to see blisters form please contact us for advice.

Why does Shipways recommend Epoxy over other options? Epoxy finishes last longer than Chlorinated Rubber and many years worth of experience has shown that they are more forgiving of DIY application mistakes than Chlorinated Rubber finishes. Epoxy finishes do have two main areas of weakness and that is that they tend to chalk above the water line and are not the best option where hot (over 32°C) water is involved where they can tend to soften.
In these cases we recommend 677 Supergloss. 677 Supergloss is also excellent for fountains and decorative ponds.
Chlorinated Rubber is a slightly cheaper option but does not last as long. If a pool is painted with chlorinated rubber then in a perfect world we would like you to remove it and apply epoxy. Often this represents a lot of work and an expense people are not prepared to undertake so we have a complete guide on the use of chlorinated rubber too!

Why did we sell you too much paint?
We didn’t. If you gave us accurate measurements of your pool (and its a regular shape) then there isn’t much room for error. The product data sheets give figures for coverage in square metres per litre of paint so you can check our figures.
It is quite possible to paint 2 coats on a pool using less than we have recommended and still have the job look good just by pushing harder on the roller and spreading the paint out further. However if the measurements and calculations are correct and you end up with 30-50% of your paint left over then it has been applied too thinly. The job will look great but it will not last as long AND there may be other problems that arise.
I need to use the pool over the weekend! Why Cant I? Pool painting is a critical process and problems can arise all to easily. Temperature and weather conditions need to be ideal. The pool surface needs to be properly dry – prior to painting. The paint takes time to dry and cure properly. All of these factors mean that the job cannot be rushed. Painting damp concrete or filling a pool too soon will lead to problems.

For further information please see the following information Sheets and Project Guides:-

2 Care & Feeding of your newly Painted Pool

3 Painting Spa's Bath Tubs & Tiles


Project Guide for Concrete / Marblesheen Pools

a) Unpainted
b) Painted with an Unknown type of paint
c) Already Painted with an Epoxy Two Pack Epoxy Paint : Already Painted with a Chlorinated Rubber Paint

Project Guide for a Fibreglass Pool

a) Unpainted or Already Painted with an Epoxy Two Pack Epoxy Paint
b) Painted with an Unknown type of paint
c) Already Painted with an Epoxy Two Pack Epoxy Paint or Unpainted
d) Already Painted with a Chlorinated Rubber Paint Paint









Care & Feeding of your newly Painted Pool


Pool You have just spent hard earned money and invested a fair amount of time and effort in painting your swimming pool or spa. Please take the time to read this guide as it will give you some suggestions and guidelines to the mai ntenance and care of your pool to ensure you maximise the life of your coating.

Also ensure you read all the literature on painting your pool and the paint product you are using.
Please remember that we recommend 7 days for full cure (at 25ºC). Normally we recommend against painting outside pools in winter but if it can’t be avoided we suggest allowing at least 14 days for full cure.

Initial Problems (prior to filling the pool):

Water Contact:
We recommend 7 days for full cure (at 25ºC) before water contact. This refers to filling the pool but also with rainfall.
Premature filling of the pool or heavy rain pooling in the bottom of the pool may compromise the life of the coating. In the case of premature filling or heavy rainfall please contact us for advice on how to proceed. Any water collected in the bottom of the pool should be removed as soon as possible.

Rain spotting and light moisture is less of a problem if it occurs more than 6 hours after application of the coating. Rain or dew inside this 6 hour period may result in a milky discolouration or 'bloom' on the paint’s surface. This will not affect the durability of the coating as the effect is in the surface only and is more one of appearance than of durability.

If blooming occurs in intermediate coats then allow the coat to dry till it tack free and then lightly sanded with 'wet and dry' type abrasive paper (200-300 grit). Remove the dirt and sanding dust and then continue with the next coat. If this occurs in the final coat the simplest action is to leave it as is. The bloom should gradually disappear and may not even be visible when the pool is filled with water. If the bloom is significant or the pool colour is one that will show it up then it can be removed, after full cure, by scrubbing techniques or allowed to wear away with normal use. The scrubbing process is best carried out using a plastic scouring pad (Scotch Brite type), or a medium scrubbing brush/cloth with a mild abrasive household cleaned. If left untreated, the bloom will usually disappear within a few weeks of the pool being filled with water.

Leaves, Dirt and Bugs: Any leaves or insects that may be have been trapped on the surface during cure may be removed by GENTLY scraping and light sanding after full cure of 5 days. Leaf stains on the surface will generally disappear within the first week or so of the pool being filled, and chlorinated.

Filling the Pool: Please check with local authorities before filling the pool. Permits may be required. There may also be companies in your area that hire temporary “bladders” for onsite storage of water whilst the pool is being painted. If you are using bore water to fill your pool please consult a specialist pool supplies company for water testing and recommendations.

Chemical Treatments: Filter for 24 hours minimum and treat water. It is preferable to allow a further 3-4 days before adding the chemicals especially in winter. After adding the chemicals allow overnight for the chemicals to be fully incorporated and then vacuum any sediment from the pool floor. Continuous filtration should be carried out until the water becomes crystal clear. NOTE: Initial additions of pool chemicals or salt should be mixed as slurry in water prior to adding to the pool. When added they should be dispersed (mixed in) as quickly as possible by vigorous agitation across the pool surface. It is most important to prevent high doses of chemical to sit in contact with the painted surface.

Maintaining the Pool: This information sheet is not meant to replace advice from a pool care specialist or pool and spa’s association. For complete advice on how to treat your pool please discuss matters with a specialist pool care company or association. Don’t forget to tell them that the pool is painted with an epoxy (Forminex Epoxy Pool Paint) or a 2 Pack packurethane (Forminex Supergloss) coating.

Chalking: Probably the most common problem experienced with painted pools and spas is that of “chalking”. This refers to the formation of whitish powdery deposits on the underwater areas of the pool coating. These deposits are usually an indication of a low “Total Alkalinity”. Depending on many factors this problem may show after a long period of time or in just a few weeks. It is most commonly seen as a powder or stain on the bathers or feet of people leaving the pool. If these deposits are allowed to develop unchecked, this may result in reduced life expectancy of the coating due to the abrasive action of pool cleaners on the paint surface. Total alkalinity is typically measured in ppm or parts per million. Total alkalinity should be initially adjusted to the upper end of the suggested range (180ppm), and then maintained within the range 160 to 180 ppm. Please discuss your pool chemistry with your specialist pool care company or association if adjustment is required. Remember when adding chemicals to a pool to allow time for them to mix in properly before re-checking measurements. This “chalking” behaviour is a natural process during the life of the pool coating and is not usually a result of any defect in the paint or the application process. It can however be greatly accelerated by water chemistry.

By minimising chalking you can maximise the life of the coating. As part of your routine pool checks you should regularly check Total Alkalinity and ensure it is maintained in the range 160-180 ppm. Keeping all the pools chemical levels within spec is important however we particularly draw people’s attention to the Total Alkalinity as levels as low as 20ppm are acceptable for a healthy pool and it is common to see well kept pools in the 50-100ppm range. That range of Total Alkalinity is acceptable for a healthy pool – just not the best for the pool coating’s life.

Cleaning: A regular cleaning program is important for both the health of the water in your pool and the life of whatever treatment has been used on the walls and floor of the pool. Regular vacuuming of the pool will help keep the pool clean and also remove undissolved solids such as chlorine compounds that may settle out to the pool bottom. Once a month to once every two months the walls and floor of the pool should be vigorously brushed to remove any chalky deposits present. Automatic pool cleaner devices make life easy but you need to be aware that as they are a constant abrasive presence in the pool they may shorten the life of the coating by wearing it away faster than anticipated.




Painting Spa's Bath Tubs & Tiles>


Pool 677 Supergloss is a two-pack, non-yellowing polyurethane. It is extremely hard wearing and is resistant to soaps and acids and is resistant to hot water and is ideal for use in bath tubs, spas, tiles and laminates.
1. Wash thoroughly with sugar soap and rinse with fresh water. Allow to dry completely. (Usually 2-3 days at 20°C.)
2. Wipe surface with 669 FX150 Thinners.
3. For baths and other metal surfaces treat any rusty areas with a rust converter. Leave to dry for at least 6 hours.
4. Any chipped or damaged areas should be wiped with 643 Ceramaglass and then filled with an Epoxy Filler or an Automotive Body Filler. When the filler is hard, sand with 80 grit ‘wet and dry’ sand paper to a smooth, level finish. Wipe this area again with 669 FX150 Thinners.
5. Apply 1 coat of 643 Ceramaglass to entire surface as per instructions Allow to dry for 1 hour. If the job is left for longer than 24 hours 643 Ceramaglass will need to be re-applied.
6. Apply 1 coat of 678 Universal Undercoat. Leave to dry minimum 8 hours at 20°C. Sand smooth using 400 grit ‘wet and dry’ paper and wipe with thinners.
7. Apply 1st coat of 677 Supergloss in choice of colour. Leave to dry 8 hours. Sand smooth (wet & dry 400), wipe with thinners.
8. Apply the second and final coat of 677 Supergloss.

Notes: This coating system can achieve excellent results when applied by brush or mohair roller. A roller will produce a slight stippled or textured finish. A high quality brush will produce a smooth almost new look to the final coats. We recommend the use of a half face respirator whilst brushing or rolling these products. If painting in a bathroom remember to provide good ventilation.

An almost flawless finish can be produced by spray applying the products. However, it is ESSENTIAL that when spraying 678 Universal Undercoat and 677 Supergloss that you ensure that you are fully aware of the risks and precautions involved in spray painting isocyanate containing coatings.
We do not recommend spray application by the do-it-yourself applicator.

Where possible such painting should be done in an approved spray booth. An independent air supplied full face respirator complying with AS/NZS 1715 ‘Selection, use and maintenance of respiratory protective devices’ should be used. Once painted the coating system requires 7 days to fully cure (at 25°C). Do not use the bathtub or expose the surface to water, steam, heat or chemicals during this period. Try to prevent the ambient temperature falling below 10°C for this time. A minimum temperature of 15°C would be preferred.

Avoid painting onto very hot or cold surfaces. The surface temperature must be between 10 - 30°C. Do not apply when humidity is above 80%. As surface temperatures, especially for metals, are usually below the air temperature when cold we normally suggest avoiding this type of restoration work in colder weather unless heating can be maintained for the 7 day period.

Avoid brushing horizontally on sides of bath as sagging may occur.
Coverage of 678 Universal Undercoat is approx. 10-12m2/litre and 677 Supergloss is approx. 12-14m2/litre (per application.)




Project Guide - MarbleSheen / Concrete - UnPainted

With Epoxy

With Chlorinated Rubber


Pool Whilst 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint can also be used for the painting of new concrete and marblesheen pools and will do an excellent job.

We prefer to recommend 656 Epoxy Pool Paint (Two Pack) for this purpose (see our “Painting a Swimming Pool” Guide).

It has been our experience over many years that 656 Epoxy Pool Paint will last longer and is more forgiving of applicator errors then the Chlorinated Rubber system. It is often not practical to strip or remove an existing chlorinated rubber coating so for re-coating a pool previously painted with a chlorinated rubber coating we recommend 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint. Prior to painting it is essential to carry out a compatibility test to ensure the previous coating is compatible with the chlorinated rubber system.

With Epoxy


Preparation: Ensure the pool surface is sound and the concrete or marble sheen is not loose, drummy or badly cracked or pitted. Small chips or flaked areas may be repaired using suitable epoxy fillers however we recommend seeking professional advice for more significant problems as there may be issues present that are beyond the capability of the DIY applicator.

Before painting a new, unpainted concrete pool or recently repaired areas you should ensure that no water proofing agents or cement additives were used in the final render layers as these may affect the adhesion of the paint.
Allow at least 4 to 6 weeks for the new or repaired concrete to cure before painting. The surface should be rubbed using a wooden block to ensure a smooth finish and remove any pinnacles of sand or coarse areas. Many substances can be deposited on the walls and floor of a pool over years of use. This step is designed to remove contaminants such as sun tan lotions, body fats, oils, greases and the like. Wash the surface with 684 Super Wash using a stiff brush or broom. 684 Super Wash should be mixed 500mls into 20 litres of fresh water for general cleaning. Mix 1:1 with water for heavy deposits of oily or greasy material. Wash 2 - 3 square metres at a time & rinse thoroughly with fresh water as you go. Do not allow the Super Wash to dry on the surface.

The following step removes deposited salts and chemicals on the pools surfaces. The surface should be acid etched with a dilute solution of Hydrochloric Acid.
o Ensure you are wearing the correct protective clothing. Rubber Boots, Rubber Gloves and goggles. It is also a good idea to be wearing a long sleeved shirt and trousers.
o Mix the acid solution in a plastic bucket (not metal) and always add the acid to the water NOT the water to the acid. Add 1 part by volume of acid to 2 parts of water.
o Work on a small area at a time, 2 – 3 m² is ideal. Apply the acid using a plastic watering can and scrub the surface using a stiff bristled nylon scrubbing brush or broom. When the bubbling reaction stops immediately rinse the area with fresh water. Do not allow the acid to dry on the surface as this will adversely affect the coating. Neutralise the acid washed surface with a mixture of 1kg of Acid Neutraliser into 10 litres fresh water. This will prevent residual acid from interfering with the coating being applied. Rinse thoroughly with clean water to remove any residue of the acid neutraliser. Allow 2 - 3 days at a minimum of 20°C to dry prior to painting (warm, sunny days).

To test whether the surface is dry enough to paint, tape a small square of clear plastic to centre of floor of pool early a.m. & check at noon. If condensation has formed under plastic, further drying is required.

Painting: Painting should be done during the warmer months, this will assist with curing. Check forecast for a period when no rain is predicted or heavy dew is unlikely. NOTE: If the freshly painted pool is spotted by rain or dew the surface may become bloomed (cloudy looking). If this occurs, thoroughly abrade (sand) surface prior to continuing with next coat. If water collects in the bottom of the pool before the coating is fully cured, premature failure may result. Early morning to 11am is the best time of day to paint, as long as the surface is totally dry and the surface temperature is above 10°C. Ideal application temperature 15-30°C. Painting when the temperature is outside this range may damage the coating. Avoid painting in direct sunlight as this will cause paint to dry too quickly.

Do not paint if temperature is likely to drop below 10°C during curing period. Remember in cold conditions surface temperatures are likely to be lower than ambient (surrounding) temperatures. 656 Epoxy Pool Paint is a two pack product. The mix ratio is 4 parts of Part A and 1 part of Part B. A 4 litre can of Part A contains 3.2 litres and when mixed with the 1 litre can of Part B (which contains 800ml) the result is 4 litres of paint. It is best to mix full cans to avoid mixing errors. We stock a range of graduated mixing cups if you plan on mixing smaller amounts but we do not recommend this practice. When mixed the resultant product has a pot life of 4 hours (at 25°C) so only mix what you can use in 1 to 2 hours. Keep the mixed paint in a cool shaded area and out of direct sun or pot life will be dramatically shortened. Add the Part B to the Part A and mix thoroughly with a wide flat bladed stirrer or “potato masher” type mixed. Ensure that you have mixed the paint thoroughly as failure to do so may result in drying problems.

Always apply 656 Epoxy Pool Paint at the recommended application rate. Do not apply thin coats as this will result in premature wear of the coating. We have calculated the amount of paint you need for the measurements of your pool. If you have a significant quantity left over then you have not put enough on the surface.
Sweep or vacuum the pool to remove any dust or dirt. Depending on the porosity of the surface, apply 2 - 3 coats of 656 Epoxy Pool Paint. If 3 coats are used the first coat should be thinned 20%. The second and third coats should be applied un-thinned.

Apply 1st coat 656 Epoxy Pool Paint, thinning by 20% for a porous surface or a 3 coat system. Apply second coat when the surface is firm to walk on. This is usually a minimum of 8 hours. If more than 24 hours passes after the application of the first coat then the first coat should be sanded to provide a key and all sanding dust removed before applying the 2nd coat of 656 Epoxy Pool Paint.

If applying a 3rd coat allow a minimum of 8 hours as for the second coat. Do not fill the pool until paint is fully cured. This will take 7 days during summer and up to 14 days during colder conditions. Avoid leaving pool empty for extended periods as chalking of paint surface may occur. During the first month of the pool being filled the paint surface is particularly sensitive to strong doses of chemical. It is better to bring the chemical levels up gradually.

With Chlorinated Rubber

Preparation: Ensure the pool surface is sound and the concrete or marble sheen is not loose, drummy or badly cracked or pitted. Small chips or flaked areas may be repaired using suitable epoxy fillers however we recommend seeking professional advice for more significant problems as there may be issues present that are beyond the capability of the DIY applicator.

Before painting a new, unpainted concrete pool or recently repaired areas you should ensure that no water proofing agents or cement additives were used in the final render layers as these may affect the adhesion of the paint.

Allow at least 4 to 6 weeks for the new or repaired concrete to cure before painting.

The surface should be rubbed using a wooden block to ensure a smooth finish and remove any pinnacles of sand or coarse areas. Many substances can be deposited on the walls and floor of a pool over years of use. This step is designed to remove contaminants such as sun tan lotions, body fats, oils, greases and the like. Wash the surface with 684 Super Wash using a stiff brush or broom. 684 Super Wash should be mixed 500mls into 20 litres of fresh water for general cleaning.

Mix 1:1 with water for heavy deposits of oily or greasy material. Wash 2 - 3 square metres at a time & rinse thoroughly with fresh water as you go. Do not allow 684 Super Wash to dry on surface. The following step removes deposited salts and chemicals on the pools surfaces. The surface should be acid etched with a dilute solution of Hydrochloric Acid.

Ensure you are wearing the correct protective clothing. Rubber Boots, Rubber Gloves and goggles. It is also a good idea to be wearing a long sleeved shirt and trousers.

Mix the acid solution in a plastic bucket (not metal) and always add the acid to the water NOT the water to the acid. Add 1 part by volume of acid to 2 parts of water. Work on a small area at a time, 2 – 3 m² is ideal. Apply the acid using a plastic watering can and scrub the surface using a stiff bristled nylon scrubbing brush or broom. When the bubbling reaction stops immediately rinse the area with fresh water. Do not allow the acid to dry on the surface as this will adversely affect the coating.

Neutralise the acid washed surface with a mixture of 1kg Acid Neutraliser into 10 litres of fresh water. This will prevent residual acid from interfering with the coating being applied. Rinse thoroughly with clean water to remove any residue of the acid neutraliser. Allow 2 - 3 days at a minimum of 20°C to dry prior to painting (warm, sunny days).

To test whether the surface is dry enough to paint, tape a small square of clear plastic to centre of floor of pool early a.m. & check at noon. If condensation has formed under plastic, further drying is required.

PAINTING: Painting should be done during the warmer months, this will assist with curing. Check forecast for a period when no rain is predicted or heavy dew is unlikely. NOTE: If the freshly painted pool is spotted by rain or dew the surface may become bloomed (cloudy looking). If this occurs, thoroughly abrade surface prior to continuing with the next coat. If water collects in the bottom of the pool before the coating is fully cured, premature failure may result. Early morning to 11am is the best time of day to paint, as long as the surface is totally dry and the surface temperature is above 10°C. Ideal application temperature 15-30°C. Painting when the temperature is outside this range may damage the coating. Avoid painting in direct sunlight as this will cause paint to dry too quickly. Do not paint if temperature is likely to drop below 10°C during curing period. Remember in cold conditions surface temperatures are likely to be lower than ambient temperatures.

340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint should be thoroughly mixed before use with a wide flat bladed stirrer or “potato masher” type mixer. Keep the mixed paint in a cool shaded area and out of direct sun. Always apply 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint at the recommended application rate. Do not apply thin coats as this will result in premature wear of the coating. We have calculated the amount of paint you need for the measurements of your pool. If you have a significant quantity left over then you have not put enough on the surface.

Apply 1st coat 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint thinned 20% with 654 Chlorinated Rubber Thinners. Do not apply too thickly as blisters may occur. Apply second coat when the surface is firm to walk on. This is usually a minimum of 12 hours. Do not apply too thickly as blisters may occur. Do not thin the second coat unless the surface being painted is unusually porous. Check with Shipway Spescoat first!

Apply third coat when the surface is firm to walk on. This is usually a minimum of 12 hours. Do not apply too thickly as blisters may occur. Do not thin the third coat. Applying Chlorinated Rubber Coatings too thickly or applying them when sun or wind can rapidly dry the surface can result in trapped solvents and later problems with blistering. Do not fill the pool until paint is fully cured. This will take 7 days during summer and up to 14 days during colder conditions. Avoid leaving pool empty for extended periods as chalking of paint surface may occur.

During the first month of the pool being filled the paint surface is particularly sensitive to strong doses of chemical. It is better to bring the chemical levels up gradually.

Remember to read ALL our literature on the painting of swimming pools including the general guide, the data sheet on the Epoxy Pool Paint and most importantly the guide to caring for your pool after painting.




Project Guide - MarbleSheen / Concrete - Fibreglass - Unknown type of Paint

Unknown type of Paint Compatability Test:


Soak a small area of cloth with 674 XT-120 Thinners and rub the test surface with a cloth for approx. 30 seconds. If the surface becomes sticky, redissolves and comes off onto the cloth, then the paint that has been used, is most likely to be Chlorinated Rubber and Chlorinated Rubber type Paint should be used.

If the surface is unaffected then it is probably a two pack paint (either Two Pack Epoxy or a Two Pack Polyurethane) and Chlorinated Rubber should not be used.




Project Guide - MarbleSheen / Concrete - Already Painted with an Epoxy Two Pack Paint


Pool Preparation: Ensure the existing paint is sound. Remove any peeling or flaking paint. Check other areas for signs of peeling or delaminating. Areas of apparently sound paint should also be checked using an adhesion test to ensure the existing paint is sound. Small areas of damaged concrete/marble sheen may be repaired with Epoxy Fillers. More significant problems should be referred to a professional. Many substances can be deposited on the walls and floor of a pool over years of use. This step is designed to remove contaminants such as sun tan lotions, body fats, oils, greases and the like. Wash the surface with 684 Super Wash using a stiff brush or broom.

684 Super Wash should be mixed 500mls into 20 litres of fresh water for general cleaning. Mix 1:1 with water for heavy deposits of oily or greasy material. Wash 2 - 3 square metres at a time & rinse thoroughly with fresh water as you go. Do not allow the Super Wash to dry on the surface.
The following step removes deposited salts and chemicals on the pools surfaces. The surface should be acid etched with a dilute solution of Hydrochloric Acid.

Ensure you are wearing the correct protective clothing. Rubber Boots, Rubber Gloves and goggles. It is also a good idea to be wearing a long sleeved shirt and trousers.

Mix the acid solution in a plastic bucket (not metal) and always add the acid to the water NOT the water to the acid. Add 1 part by volume of acid to 2 parts of water.

Work on a small area at a time, 2 – 3 m² is ideal. Apply the acid using a plastic watering can and scrub the surface using a stiff bristled nylon scrubbing brush or broom. When the bubbling reaction stops immediately rinse the area with fresh water. Do not allow the acid to dry on the surface as this will adversely affect the coating.

Neutralise the acid washed surface with a mixture of 1kg of Acid Neutraliser into 10 litres fresh water. This will prevent residual acid from interfering with the coating being applied.

Rinse thoroughly with clean water to remove any residue of the acid neutraliser. Allow 2 - 3 days at a minimum of 20°C to dry prior to painting (warm, sunny days). Thoroughly abrade or sand the entire surface to provide key for new coating to adhere to. (Surface should have visible scratch marks). Sand paper with 200 – 240 grit is recommended. Failure to properly abrade the surface before painting may lead to premature failure of the new coating system.
If using an angle grinder take care not to “dig into” the existing surface. Ensure that all dust from the sanding process is vacuumed up before proceeding.

To test whether the surface is dry enough to paint, tape a small square of clear plastic to centre of floor of pool early a.m. & check at noon. If condensation has formed under plastic, further drying is required. PAINTING: Painting should be done during the warmer months, this will assist with curing. Check forecast for a period when no rain is predicted or heavy dew is unlikely. NOTE: If the freshly painted pool is spotted by rain or dew the surface may become bloomed (cloudy looking). If this occurs, thoroughly abrade (sand) surface prior to continuing with next coat.

If water collects in the bottom of the pool before the coating is fully cured, premature failure may result. Early morning to 11am is the best time of day to paint, as long as the surface is totally dry and the surface temperature is above 10°C. Ideal application temperature 15-30°C. Painting when the temperature is outside this range may damage the coating.

Avoid painting in direct sunlight as this will cause paint to dry too quickly. Do not paint if temperature is likely to drop below 10°C during curing period. Remember in cold conditions surface temperatures are likely to be lower than ambient (surrounding) temperatures.

656 Epoxy Pool Paint is a two part product. The mix ratio is 4 parts of Part A and 1 part of Part B. A 4 litre can of Part A contains 3.2 litres and when mixed with the 1 litre can of Part B (which contains 800ml) the result is 4 litres of paint. It is best to mix full cans to avoid mixing errors. We stock a range of graduated mixing cups if you plan on mixing smaller amounts but we do not recommend this practice. When mixed the resultant product has a pot life of 4 hours (at 25°C) so only mix what you can use in 1 to 2 hours. Keep the mixed paint in a cool shaded area and out of direct sun or pot life will be dramatically shortened. Add the Part B to the Part A and mix thoroughly with a wide flat bladed stirrer or “potato masher” type mixed. Ensure that you have mixed the paint thoroughly as failure to do so may result in drying problems.

Always apply 656 Epoxy Pool Paint at the recommended application rate. Do not apply thin coats as this will result in premature wear of the coating. We have calculated the amount of paint you need for the measurements of your pool. If you have a significant quantity left over then you have not put enough on the surface.Sweep or vacuum the pool to remove any dust or dirt.

Apply a coat of 656 Epoxy Pool Paint, thinned 20% to any repaired/bare areas as a “spot primer”. Apply 1st coat 656 Epoxy Pool Paint.
Apply second coat when the surface is firm to walk on. This is usually a minimum of 8 hours. If more than 24 hours passes after the application of the first coat then the first coat should be sanded to provide a key and all sanding dust removed before applying the 2nd coat 656 Epoxy Pool Paint.

Do not fill the pool until paint is fully cured. This will take 7 days during summer and up to 14 days during colder conditions. Avoid leaving pool empty for extended periods as chalking of paint surface may occur. During the first month of the pool being filled the paint surface is particularly sensitive to strong doses of chemical. It is better to bring the chemical levels up gradually.

Remember to read ALL our literature on the painting of swimming pools including the general guide, the data sheet on the Epoxy Pool Paint and most importantly the guide to caring for your pool after painting.




Project Guide for Concrete / Marblesheen Pools - Already Painted with a Chlorinated Rubber Paint


Pool Whilst 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint can also be used for the painting of new concrete and marblesheen pools and will do an excellent job but we prefer to recommend 656 Epoxy Pool Paint for this purpose (see our “Painting a Pool” Guide). It has been our experience over many years that 656 Epoxy Pool Paint will last longer and is more forgiving of applicator errors then the Chlorinated Rubber system.

It is often not practical to strip or remove an existing chlorinated rubber coating so for re-coating a pool previously painted with a chlorinated rubber coating we recommend 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint. Prior to painting it is essential to carry out a compatibility test to ensure the previous coating is compatible with the chlorinated rubber system.

COMPATIBILITY TEST: Soak a small area of cloth with 674 XT-120 Thinners and rub the test surface with a cloth for approx. 30 seconds. If the surface becomes sticky, redissolves and comes off onto the cloth, then the paint that has been used, is most likely to be Chlorinated Rubber.

If the surface is unaffected then it is probably a two pack paint (either Two Pack Epoxy or a Two Pack Polyurethane) and Chlorinated Rubber should not be used.

PREPARATION: Ensure the pool surface is sound and the concrete or marble sheen is not loose, drummy or badly cracked or pitted. Small chips or flaked areas may be repaired using suitable epoxy fillers however we recommend seeking professional advice for more significant problems as there may be issues present that are beyond the capability of the DIY applicator.

Before painting a new, unpainted concrete pool or recently repaired areas you should ensure that no water proofing agents or cement additives were used in the final render layers as these may affect the adhesion of the paint. Allow at least 4 to 6 weeks for the new or repaired concrete to cure before painting. The surface should be rubbed using a wooden block to ensure a smooth finish and remove any pinnacles of sand or coarse areas. Many substances can be deposited on the walls and floor of a pool over years of use. This step is designed to remove contaminants such as sun tan lotions, body fats, oils, greases and the like.

Wash the surface with 684 Super Wash using a stiff brush or broom. 684 Super Wash should be mixed 500mls into 20 litres of fresh water for general cleaning. Mix 1:1 with water for heavy deposits of oily or greasy material. Wash 2 - 3 square metres at a time & rinse thoroughly with fresh water as you go. Do not allow 684 Super Wash to dry on surface. The following step removes deposited salts and chemicals on the pools surfaces. The surface should be acid etched with a dilute solution of Hydrochloric Acid.

Ensure you are wearing the correct protective clothing. Rubber Boots, Rubber Gloves and goggles. It is also a good idea to be wearing a long sleeved shirt and trousers.

Mix the acid solution in a plastic bucket (not metal) and always add the acid to the water NOT the water to the acid. Add 1 part by volume of acid to 2 parts of water.

Work on a small area at a time, 2 – 3 m² is ideal. Apply the acid using a plastic watering can and scrub the surface using a stiff bristled nylon scrubbing brush or broom. When the bubbling reaction stops immediately rinse the area with fresh water. Do not allow the acid to dry on the surface as this will adversely affect the coating.

Neutralise the acid washed surface with a mixture of 1kg of Acid Neutraliser into 10 litres fresh water. This will prevent residual acid from interfering with the coating being applied.

Rinse thoroughly with clean water to remove any residue of the acid neutraliser. Allow 2 - 3 days at a minimum of 20°C to dry prior to painting (warm, sunny days). To test whether the surface is dry enough to paint, tape a small square of clear plastic to centre of floor of pool early a.m. & check at noon. If condensation has formed under plastic, further drying is required.

PAINTING: Painting should be done during the warmer months, this will assist with curing. Check forecast for a period when no rain is predicted or heavy dew is unlikely. NOTE: If the freshly painted pool is spotted by rain or dew the surface may become bloomed (cloudy looking). If this occurs, thoroughly abrade surface prior to continuing with next coat. If water collects in the bottom of the pool before the coating is fully cured, premature failure may result. Early morning to 11am is the best time of day to paint, as long as the surface is totally dry and the surface temperature is above 10°C. Ideal application temperature 15-30°C. Painting when the temperature is outside this range may damage the coating. Avoid painting in direct sunlight as this will cause paint to dry too quickly. Do not paint if temperature is likely to drop below 10°C during curing period. Remember in cold conditions surface temperatures are likely to be lower than ambient temperatures. 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint should be thoroughly mixed before use with a wide flat bladed stirrer or “potato masher” type mixed. Keep the mixed paint in a cool shaded area and out of direct sun. Always apply 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint at the recommended application rate. Do not apply thin coats as this will result in premature wear of the coating. We have calculated the amount of paint you need for the measurements of your pool.

If you have a significant quantity left over then you have not put enough on the surface.Apply 1st coat 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint thinned 20% with 654 Chlorinated Rubber Thinners. Do not apply too thickly as blisters may occur.Apply second coat when the surface is firm to walk on. This is usually a minimum of 12 hours. Do not apply too thickly as blisters may occur. Do not thin the second coat unless the surface being painted is unusually porous. Check with Shipway Spescoat first! Apply third coat when the surface is firm to walk on. This is usually a minimum of 12 hours. Do not apply too thickly as blisters may occur.

Do not thin the third coat. Applying Chlorinated Rubber Coatings too thickly or applying them when sun or wind can rapidly dry the surface can result in trapped solvents and later problems with blistering. Do not fill the pool until paint is fully cured. This will take 7 days during summer and up to 14 days during colder conditions. Avoid leaving pool empty for extended periods as chalking of paint surface may occur. During the first month of the pool being filled the paint surface is particularly sensitive to strong doses of chemical. It is better to bring the chemical levels up gradually.

Remember to read ALL our literature on the painting of swimming pools including the general guide, the relevant data sheet on the Pool Paint and most importantly the guide to caring for your pool after painting.




Project Guide for Fibreglass Pools - Unpainted


Pool Preparation: Due to the variety of Fibre-glass pool construction, many fibre-glass pools gradually deteriorate & weaken because of moisture penetrating into the fibre-glass structure. Sometimes osmosis based defects occur in the form of blisters. Check with your supplier for detailed repair details prior to painting.

Due to fibreglass being such a doubtful surface, painting of fibre-glass is done entirely at customer’s own risk.


First you must ensure the coating is a 2 pack epoxy. Refer to the 656 Epoxy Pool Paint data sheet for a simple test to differentiate between 2 pack epoxy / urethane finishes and Chlorinated Rubber finishes. Only proceed with this project guide if the existing finish is a pack two pack epoxy or two pack urethane.

Ensure the existing paint or gelcoat surface is sound. Remove any peeling or flaking paint. Check other areas for signs of peeling or de-lamination. Small damaged areas may be repaired with 690 LV Epoxy Sheathing Resin. Exposure of the glass fibre of the laminate or cracking can indicate severe structural problems may have occurred or are imminent.Professional advice should be sought.

Many substances can be deposited on the walls and floor of a pool over years of use. This step is designed to remove contaminants such as suntan lotions, body fats, oils, greases and the like. Wash the surface with 684 Super Wash using a stiff brush or broom. 684 Super Wash should be mixed 500mls into 20 litres of fresh water for general cleaning. Mix 1:1 with water for heavy deposits of oily or greasy material. Wash 2 - 3 square metres at a time and rinse thoroughly with fresh water as you go. Do not allow the Super Wash to dry on surface.

The following step removes deposited salts and chemicals on the pools surfaces. The surface should be acid etched with a dilute solution of Hydrochloric Acid.

Ensure you are wearing the correct protective clothing. Rubber Boots, Rubber Gloves and goggles. It is also a good idea to be wearing a long sleeved shirt and trousers.

Mix the acid solution in a plastic bucket (not metal) and always add the acid to the water NOT the water to the acid. Add 1 part by volume of acid to 2 parts of water.

Work on a small area at a time, 2 – 3 m² is ideal. Apply the acid using a plastic watering can and scrub the surface using a stiff bristled nylon scrubbing brush or broom. When the bubbling reaction stops immediately rinse the area with fresh water. Do not allow the acid to dry on the surface as this will adversely affect the coating.

Neutralise the acid washed surface with a mixture of 1kg Acid Neutraliser into 10 litres fresh water. This will prevent residual acid from interfering with the coating being applied.

Rinse thoroughly with clean water to remove any residue of the acid neutraliser. Allow 2 - 3 days at a minimum of 20°C to dry prior to painting (warm, sunny days). Thoroughly abrade or sand the entire surface to provide key for new coating to adhere. (Surface should have visible scratch marks). Sand paper with 200 – 240 grit is recommended. Failure to properly abrade the surface before painting may lead to premature failure of the new coating system.

If using an angle grinder take care not to “dig into” the existing surface. Do not expose glass fibre reinforcing. If this occurs then 690 LV Epoxy Sheathing Resin may be used to repair the damage before painting. Ensure that all dust from the sanding process is vacuumed up before proceeding.

To test whether the surface is dry enough to paint, tape a small square of clear plastic to centre of floor of pool early a.m. & check at noon. If condensation has formed under plastic, further drying is required.

Painting: Painting should be done during the warmer months, this will assist with curing. Check forecast for a period when no rain is predicted or heavy dew is unlikely.
Note: If the freshly painted pool is spotted by rain or dew the surface may become bloomed (cloudy looking). If this occurs, thoroughly abrade surface prior to continuing with next coat. If water collects in the bottom of the pool before the coating is fully cured, premature failure may result.

Early morning to 11am is the best time of day to paint, as long as the surface is totally dry and the surface temperature is above 10°C. Ideal application temperature 15-30°C. Painting when the temperature is outside this range may damage the coating. Avoid painting in direct sunlight as this will cause paint to dry too quickly. Do not paint if temperature is likely to drop below 10°C during curing period. Remember in cold conditions surface temperatures are likely to be lower than ambient temperatures.

656 Epoxy Pool Paint is a two pack product. The mix ratio is 4 parts of Part A and 1 part of Part B. A 4 litre can of Part A contains 3.2 litres and when mixed with the Part B (which contains 800ml) the result is 4 litres of paint. It is best to mix full cans to avoid mixing errors. We stock a range of graduated mixing cups if you plan on mixing smaller amounts but we do not recommend this practice.

When mixed the resultant product has a pot life of 4 hours (at 25°C) so only mix what you can use in 1 to 2 hours. Keep the mixed paint in a cool shaded area and out of direct sun or pot life will be dramatically shortened. Add the Part B to the Part A and mix thoroughly with a wide flat bladed stirrer or “potato masher” type mixer. Ensure that you have mixed the paint thoroughly as failure to do so may result in drying problems.

Always apply 656 Epoxy Pool Paint at the recommended application rate. Do not apply thin coats as this will result in premature wear of the coating. We have calculated the amount of paint you need for the measurements of your pool. If you have a significant quantity left over then you have not put enough on the surface.

Sweep or vacuum the pool to remove any dust or dirt.

Apply 1st coat 656 Epoxy Pool Paint.
Apply second coat when the surface is firm to walk on. This is usually a minimum of 8 hours. If more than 24 hours passes after the application of the first coat then the first coat should be sanded to provide a key and all sanding dust removed before applying the 2nd coat 656 Epoxy Pool Paint.

A 3rd coat of 656 Epoxy Pool Paint should be applied for badly worn or repaired pools to ensure a good film build over worn/repaired areas.

Do not fill the pool until paint is fully cured. This will take 7 days during summer and up to 14 days during colder conditions.

Avoid leaving pool empty for extended periods as chalking of paint surface may occur.

During the first month of the pool being filled the paint surface is particularly sensitive to strong doses of chemical. It is better to bring the chemical levels up gradually.
Remember to read ALL our literature on the painting of swimming pools including the general guide, the relevant data sheet on the Pool Paint and most importantly the guide to caring for your pool after painting.




Project Guide for a Fibreglass Pool - Already Painted with a Chlorinated Rubber Paint


Pool COMPATIBILITY TEST: To ensure that the pool is coated with chlorinated rubber please carry out this test.

Rub surface with a cloth soaked with 674 XT-120 Thinner. If the surface becomes sticky, & comes off on the cloth the paint is most likely to be a Chlorinated Rubber. If this is the case either use 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint or preferably, totally remove all paint prior to using 656 Epoxy Pool Paint (Two Pack).

Topline Paint Pty Ltd does not recommend the painting of Fibreglass Swimming Pools with Chlorinated Rubber based finishes.

We have produced this data sheet to assist you should you chose to re-paint with Chlorinated Rubber rather than follow our recommendation and remove the existing chlorinated rubber coating completely before painting with Epoxy. Topline Paint Pty Ltd will accept no responsibility for failure of Chlorinated Rubber Coating applied over Fibreglass. Remember YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!

Another Warning:
Due to the variety of Fibre-glass pool construction, many fibre-glass pools gradually deteriorate & weaken because of moisture penetrating into the fibre-glass structure. Sometimes osmosis- based defects occur in the form of blisters. Check with your supplier for detailed repair instructions prior to painting. Due to fibreglass being such a doubtful surface, painting of fibre-glass is done entirely at customer’s own risk (doubly so if you are insisting on using Chlorinated Rubber).

PREPARATION: Ensure the existing paint is sound. Remove any peeling or flaking paint. Check other areas for signs of peeling or delaminating. Small areas of damage may be repaired with Epoxy Fillers. More significant problems should be referred to a professional.

Many substances can be deposited on the walls and floor of a pool over years of use. This step is designed to remove contaminants such as sun tan lotions, body fats, oils, greases and the like. Wash the surface with 684 Super Wash using a stiff brush or broom. 684 Super Wash should be mixed 500mls into 20 litres of fresh water for general cleaning. Mix 1:1 with water for heavy deposits of oily or greasy material. Wash 2 - 3 square metres at a time & rinse thoroughly with fresh water as you go. Do not allow 684 Super Wash to dry on surface. The following step removes deposited salts and chemicals on the pools surfaces. The surface should be acid etched with a dilute solution of Hydrochloric Acid.

Ensure you are wearing the correct protective clothing. Rubber Boots, Rubber Gloves and goggles. It is also a good idea to be wearing a long sleeved shirt and trousers.

Mix the acid solution in a plastic bucket (not metal) and always add the acid to the water NOT the water to the acid. Add 1 part by volume of acid to 2 parts of water.
Work on a small area at a time, 2 – 3 m² is ideal. Apply the acid using a plastic watering can and scrub the surface using a stiff bristled nylon scrubbing brush or broom. When the bubbling reaction stops immediately rinse the area with fresh water. Do not allow the acid to dry on the surface as this will adversely affect the coating. Neutralise the acid washed surface with a mixture of 1kg Acid Neutraliser into 10 litres of fresh water. This will prevent residual acid from interfering with the coating being applied. Rinse thoroughly with clean water to remove any residue of the acid neutraliser. Allow 2 - 3 days at a minimum of 20°C to dry prior to painting (warm, sunny days).

To test whether the surface is dry enough to paint, tape a small square of clear plastic to centre of floor of pool early a.m. & check at noon. If condensation has formed under plastic, further drying is required.

PAINTING: Painting should be done during the warmer months, this will assist with curing. Check forecast for a period when no rain is predicted or heavy dew is unlikely.

NOTE: If the freshly painted pool is spotted by rain or dew the surface may become bloomed (cloudy looking). If this occurs, thoroughly abrade surface prior to continuing with next coat. If water collects in the bottom of the pool before the coating is fully cured, premature failure may result. Early morning to 11am is the best time of day to paint, as long as the surface is totally dry and the surface temperature is above 10°C. Ideal application temperature 15-30°C. Painting when the temperature is outside this range may damage the coating. Avoid painting in direct sunlight as this will cause paint to dry too quickly.

Do not paint if temperature is likely to drop below 10°C during curing period. Remember in cold conditions surface temperatures are likely to be lower than ambient temperatures. 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint should be thoroughly mixed before use with a wide flat bladed stirrer or “potato masher” type mixer. Keep the mixed paint in a cool shaded area and out of direct sun.

Always apply 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint at the recommended application rate. Do not apply thin coats as this will result in premature wear of the coating. We have calculated the amount of paint you need for the measurements of your pool. If you have a significant quantity left over then you have not put enough on the surface. Apply a coat of 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint, thinned 20% to any repaired areas and thus un-coated areas as a “spot primer”. Wipe entire surface with 654 Chlorinated Rubber Thinners and then paint immediately.

Apply 1st coat 340 Chlorinated Rubber Pool Paint. Do not apply too thickly as blisters may occur.
Apply second coat when the surface is firm to walk on. This is usually a minimum of 12 hours.
Do not apply too thickly as blisters may occur.Do not fill the pool until paint is fully cured. This will take 7 days during summer and up to 14 days during colder conditions. Avoid leaving pool empty for extended periods as chalking of paint surface may occur. During the first month of the pool being filled the paint surface is particularly sensitive to strong doses of chemical. It is better to bring the chemical levels up gradually.
Remember to read ALL our literature on the painting of swimming pools including the general guide, the relevant data sheet on the Pool Paint and most importantly the guide to caring for your pool after painting.





Before and After painting






Pool Two Pool One